Posts filed under ‘china’

Migration and Population

Migration is not a new phenomenon, but it is one which increasingly hits the headlines. It is highly controversial, with some believing the UK is too open to migrants and others defending migrants as beneficial to our economy. Meanwhile, the population of the UK and the world continues to grow amid fears about sustainability. Is there a solution to the problem?

The information in this book comes from a wide range of sources and includes government reports and statistics, newspaper reports, features, magazine articles and surveys, literature from lobby groups and charitable organisations.

You can read more about this book on the publisher’s website; you can buy it there, or on Amazon.

Editor: Cobi Smith and Lisa Firth
Publisher: Independence Educational Publishers
ISBN: 978 1 86168 423 3
Published: January 2008

February 17, 2008 at 12:51 pm Leave a comment

Training for agricultural development

You can download the magazine containing this article from the ACPFG website (I also edited this magazine).

The Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics (ACPFG) is hosting a talented plant scientist from China.

Dr Xiaojuan Wang is a plant scientist and Associate Professor at Lanzhou University in northwest China. She has joined the ACPFG in Adelaide for six months, where she is studying genes and loci related to low salt accumulation in Arabidopsis.

Dr Wang is looking forward to the challenges of studying overseas for the first time.

“Meeting people from different cultural backgrounds will open my eyes. Also, it should be a good chance to improve my English,” she said.

Dr Wang’s Australian project is jointly funded by the Federal Government’s Australia-China Council and the Crawford Fund. The Crawford Fund gives talented agricultural scientists from developing countries practical training at an Australian agricultural research institute, which they can apply to agricultural development in their home county.

Dr Wang will be passing on knowledge gained at the ACPFG to students when she returns to China.

“I have completed the ACPFG Transformation Workshop and am starting my experiments on salt tolerance. My time at ACPFG will strengthen my knowledge of DNA transformation and molecular mechanisms in salt tolerance, as well as giving me practical training,” she said.

In China, Dr Wang has been investigating the genetic diversity of alfalfa germplasm in arid and semi-arid areas using molecular markers.

In 2005 she worked on a project with the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research, collaborating with South Australian researchers to develop lucerne adapted to harsh conditions in China and Australia.

Dr Wang is now working in Professor Mark Tester’s lab with the support of Dr Stuart Roy.

“I hope my six month visit to the ACPFG is the start of more collaboration between the ACPFG and Lanzhou University. Our university encourages us to establish links with laboratories overseas, so I hope people from the ACPFG will come to Lanzhou University in the future,” she said.

October 3, 2006 at 5:26 pm Leave a comment


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giant chess + ice skating in Geneva

Carouge is cute. Spot the duck, key and pumpkin.

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