Posts filed under ‘australia’

thank you!

Thank you to everyone who helped my crowdfunding campaign succeed! I’m now in the process of organising and sending out rewards for those who selected them. For those who didn’t select a reward and for those who helped in other ways, spreading the word, helping me make a new video or giving me a boost of moral support when I needed it, I hope my thanks is enough! Crowdfunding is about community – I am so grateful for the web of kind and passionate people who share my life.

This is my last week in Melbourne before I fly back to Geneva for the rest of the year, which is a busy week.

Monday to Wednesday I’m hosting Open Knowledge Australia open development drop-in sessions; you can also participate online: https://pad.okfn.org/p/opendevaus .

Wednesday night I’m telling a story about Rachel Carson at The Laborastory.

Finally this Friday the 17th of October, I’m co-hosting The Privacy Workshop. I’m honoured to be part of a fantastic team of innovative and passionate people driving discussions Australia needs to have. This is a forum created by people living and working in technology about Australian human rights in this digital era. If you have the opportunity to participate in person, I look forward to seeing you there – it’s going to be an invaluable experience.

October 13, 2014 at 11:41 am Leave a comment

my first crowdfunding experience

Following an intense 3 months in Geneva I’m flying back to Melbourne this weekend to present my first-ever Melbourne show, Delusions of Slander, in the Melbourne Fringe Festival next week. I’m also doing a bunch of other things while I’m back for three weeks, but at this stage Melbourne Fringe Festival is occupying most of my attention.

I’m running my first-ever crowdfunding campaign to cover the costs of the show. I’m running it through Pozible, because I’ve been involved Pozible as a supporter from their earlier days when we coworked in Hub Melbourne at the same time.  I’ve supported 25 projects on the crowdfunding platform before creating my own. I’ve been a supporter of many projects that reached success and shared in the joy of creators when they reached their goals. I’ve also supported some projects that didn’t make it over the line, or cancelled their campaign before the end.

So I knew it was going to be stressful, but of course knowing this doesn’t stop it from being so. I know I’m in the awkward middle bit where people considering supporting see there’s still some days left to pledge, so why not wait until the end when it’s all the more exciting? I did that for the first few campaigns I supported, then when I got to know people running campaigns, I realized it’s so much more valuable to people in the early stages. It’s so valuable to give someone a little boost of confidence and hope during an uncertain lull.

If you’d like to give me that little boost now, I would be so grateful!

http://pozi.be/delusionsofslander

One of the beautiful things about crowdfunding is feeling a sense of connection with people that I haven’t seen perhaps in a long time, but who decide to support my campaign. People from different parts of my life have pledged support – people I haven’t seen in person since high school, people I’ve worked with in the past, peers in science communication. These people emerge from the forest of my network into my conscious awareness, like trees. The kind of trees that make my network like an old-growth forest and not a plantation.

I don’t know how to thank these people, beyond rewards – and some haven’t chosen a reward at all. So I’m trusting that they will experience the fulfilling emotion of shared joy if I reach my goal. That’s what motivates me to support other people’s campaigns, so it makes sense that it motivates others to support mine. Experiencing that feeling of connection from the creator side of the project has an intensity I’ve not experienced before.

September 26, 2014 at 4:57 am Leave a comment

life in Melbourne

I feel incredibly lucky to be living in Melbourne right now – the weather’s suspiciously stunning, I can walk from where I’m living to my office and I can indulge in the entire Melbourne International Comedy Festival season.

I’m in a writing groove, averaging about 1000 words a day. This would have seemed challenging at the start of my PhD, but now that I’ve reached the other side of the gaping canyon that is the middle of a PhD, I can look into the chasm and use it as inspiration, rather than feeling paralyzed with vertigo. Now I’ve plenty to say and unlike at the start of my research, I can draw on others’ work to back it up.

I’m also feeling like less of an impostor as a Visiting Scholar at Melbourne Law School, after being a guest speaker in Global Governance, participating in a day-long intensive about governance of REDD+, drawing on my recent experiences living in Asia. I was able to raise awareness of indigenous peoples’ concerns about how international agreements are being implemented, while having fascinating discussions about forest and development governance with Masters students from places including Chile, Ecuador, Guatemala, Indonesia, Pakistan and Palestine. Thanks to the inspirational Margaret Young for asking me to be involved.

To balance my serious PhD work, I’m also delighted to be participating in the Melbourne International Comedy Festival’s professional development program for funny women this coming weekend.

 

 

 

April 1, 2014 at 12:17 pm 1 comment

return to Oz

I’m back in Australia! I have much updating to do, but here’s a quick note to report that I’m based in Melbourne for the next while. The University of Melbourne have kindly accepted me as a Visiting Scholar within Melbourne Law School, allowing me a room of one’s own (or a carrel of one’s own at least) and access to wonderful resources, which should allow me to finish writing my PhD in the coming months. The first peer-reviewed paper emerging from my PhD has finally been published earlier this month (DOI: 10.1177/2158244014523791). I went to great lengths to make it open access, so please enjoy reading it paywall-free!

I was under contractual obligations to limit public comment related to my work during the last year, which impacted this site. Those same contractual obligations meant I had to take leave from my PhD for a year to do the very interesting things I did, hence I’m coming back to it now. It was a profound year that changed my views of the world, in which I did many novel things. They included riding a motorbike in Thailand hundreds of kilometres, helping indigenous peoples to produce a comic book about human rights, presenting about Wikipedia and women in technology in Cambodia with Khmer translators, and helping organise a dance flashmob for women’s rights as part of One Billion Rising.

I’m still processing how all of these experiences inform my life now and dealing with some reverse culture-shock. I’m lucky to have a space to focus in Melbourne that is allowing me to segue into the post-PhD chapter of my life…

March 7, 2014 at 1:01 pm Leave a comment

update

I’m now working as a freelance consultant while working on my PhD – recent projects include:

I’ll be performing regularly in the 2013 Adelaide Fringe – information about some of those shows will appear here later.

December 5, 2012 at 4:17 pm Leave a comment

Adacamp

I wrote this article about my Adacamp experience for RiAus when I worked there.

Recently I was honoured to attend the first-ever AdaCamp, an ‘unconference’ for women in open technology, hosted by The Ada Initiative at the CERES Community Environment Park in Melbourne.  I was attending this during my holidays with no particular affiliation; however it became evident throughout the day that the conference had relevance to my role at RiAus in many ways.

This conference preceded linux.conf.au, an open technology conference, but was specifically for women. Why? For reasons the Ada Initiative was set up to address. Women are underrepresented in the technology industry – which is why RiAus has hosted activities such as the WIT luncheon late last year. Most starkly, women make up less than 2% ofparticipants in open source projects. Given that RiAus is about bringing science (including computer science) to people and people to science, this is an issue of concern. Open philosophies align well with the RiAus raison d’être, as they allow people of all types and backgrounds to benefit from the wonders of science. Last year I presented on a panel at Flinders University library during open access week. Whether it’s open access to research or open source technology there are shared principles — which was the theme of one of the AdaCamp sessions, captured here.

One of the first sessions at AdaCamp was dedicated to the impostor syndrome, which afflicts women in science as much as women in open technology (everybody in the session, including myself, identified with this). I added to that wiki a feature in Nature about the impostor syndrome in women scientists. Speaking of which, women are underrepresented as editors of Wikipedia. Have you ever used Wikipedia? Have you ever contributed to it? I had, but it never occurred to me to identify as an editor until I heard that women were underrepresented – and there’s a mailing list about that.

One of the best things about AdaCamp was meeting some amazing women from around Oceania and beyond who are using their passion to defy stereotypes of who participates in open projects. You can see a photo of us, and read blog posts from other participants, here. AdaCamp stood out for me from other conferences because everyone participated and seemed to really want to go beyond the conference and drive things out in the real world (thanks in part, I’m sure, to the ‘unconference’ format). I found it useful to identify potential speakers and presenters for future RiAus programs, and to get ideas for projects that could work in other organisations I’ve been involved with, such as Hackerspace Adelaide.

It also made me look at whether women are represented in technology projects RiAus is involved with, such as the upcoming 3D Printing workshop, which will indeed feature an exceptional woman in technology — Dr Genevieve Bell from Intel.

February 15, 2012 at 4:34 pm Leave a comment

still south but north, video editing

I grew up in the southern state of a country in the Southern Hemisphere, South Australia. No geography confusion there. At the moment I’m living in the northernmost region of another country in the same hemisphere, which means I’m living in the north, even though for most of the world with internet access it’s still the south. However from my perspective, and that of Chileans, Arica is a northern extremity. It’s also extreme thanks to its exceptionally dry climate, which trumps that of my home town, Adelaide, which is also noted for aridity.

Arica is also an interesting place to be right now because Chile’s president, Sebastián Piñera, popped up this week for a celebration. The occasion was the day during the War of the Pacific (not to be confused with the Pacific War), when Chile took this region from Peru. Or more specifically, a big rock by the beach in Arica.

You might ask what I’m doing here, besides brushing up on South American history and international relations and taking South American Spanish classes. Despite reaching intermediate level in Spain, I needed classes because the language on this continent is different. So much so that I’m reading a book called “How to survive in the Chilean jungle,” which is not a guide to a jungle at all (I’m on the edge of the Atacama Desert), but rather the vocabulary unique to this skinny but vast nation.

As well as polishing my thesis I’ve been editing on a series of videos. They’re for one of the research institutes based at the University of Adelaide I’ve worked with before, the Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics. You can see one here. I filmed the content before I left the country. I have my camera with me, so you can expect content from South America down the track.

June 11, 2010 at 8:37 am 2 comments

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